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Population, Refugees, and Migration (U.S. Department of State)

Secretary Antony J. Blinken, Mexican Foreign Secretary Alicia Bárcena, and Guatemalan Foreign Minister Carlos Ramiro Martínez before the U.S.-Mexico-Guatemala Trilateral Migration Ministerial Meeting

Antony J. Blinken, Secretary of State

Benjamin Franklin Room

SECRETARY BLINKEN:  Thank you and good morning, everyone.  Alicia, Carlos Ramiro, colleagues – welcome.  It’s wonderful to have you here today.  We have the opportunity today to host two of our most important partners in the region, Mexico and Guatemala.  And I have to tell you how much we appreciate the cooperation and the collaboration that we’ve had starting, of course, with the López Obrador administration.  I had the opportunity speaking to this yesterday to note that, at least from my perspective, the collaboration, the work between the governments of Mexico and the United States has never been stronger, never been greater.  The challenges are also significant but we are facing them together across the board, and that’s something that the United States deeply appreciates.

And indeed, the collaboration that we have in many ways represents a model for what we would hope to see throughout our hemisphere, including with Guatemala.  And here I have to say how much we both appreciate and admire the work of the new Arévalo administration – very, very pleased to see the transition take place and the government not only in place but acting strongly to meet the challenges of our moment, including the challenge of irregular migration.  And of course, we know as Mexico heads into an election season as well, we wish our Mexican friends every success.

Today we are really here to double down on the collaboration that we have in dealing with migration flows.  We know that all of us are living in what is genuinely a historic time – around the world, more people on the move than at any time in recorded history, and the same is true of course in our own hemisphere.  We have a shared commitment to safe, orderly, humane migration, and we want to make sure that the work that we are doing continues to move us in that direction.

At the same time, I think we’re all well attuned to the importance of focusing on root causes.  In effect, people should have a right to remain in their own countries, but that means that the conditions have to exist that really make it not only possible but attractive for them to remain.  The bottom line for so many people around the world is if you can’t put food on the table for your kids, you’ll try to figure out anything necessary to do that, including leaving your own country, your own community, your own family, your own language, your own culture.  So creating those opportunities is a critical piece of addressing this challenge.  Vice President Harris has led a major effort that’s producing major results in terms of private-sector investment in Guatemala, in Honduras, in El Salvador.  We’ve already seen results, and those results are translating into new opportunities for people at home.

We also, of course, are looking at other important things that we can and should be doing together, including expanding lawful pathways to migration, including expanding protection for migrants, including supporting and expanding the processes of asylum and other ways for people in other countries to stay where they are.

So in all of these areas our countries are working together, and that only underscores the fact that when it comes to irregular migration we have to meet this together, not only among Mexico, Guatemala, and the United States but all the countries in our region.  That was the spirit of the Los Angeles Declaration and of the meeting that took place during the Summit of the Americas, a commitment by countries of origin, countries of transit, countries of destination to work together, because no single country can effectively deal with this challenge alone.

So I’m looking very much forward today to hearing from our colleagues about the progress that we’ve made.  And of course, we’ve had intense collaboration with Mexico, including in recent weeks, with multiple virtually monthly high-level meetings among us and then weekly – even daily – engagements among our officials.  And I look forward as well to talking about how we can move forward with the Los Angeles Declaration and the work that we will be doing there.

So with that, again, welcome to everyone.  Alicia, let me turn it over to you.

FOREIGN SECRETARY BÁRCENA:  (Via interpreter) Thank you very much and good morning, everyone.  Dear Secretary Antony Blinken, dear friend Alejandro Mayorkas, Liz Sherwood-Randall, Richard Verma, Isobel Coleman, Lisa Monaco, Ken, dear friend Carlos Ramiro, Antonio Escobedo, Francisco Villagran, Vivian Arenas – good morning.  It’s such a pleasure to have you across the table this morning.

I wanted to extend the warmest greetings, first of all, from our president Andrés Manuel López Obrador, and especially thank Secretary Blinken for the warm welcome he has given us once again in Washington, both to the Mexican delegation with me – we are very well represented here with our ambassador Esteban Moctezuma, with Martín Borrego, Christina Planter, Ana Luisa Fajer – and I would like to say to you that I believe that we have a unique opportunity at this trilateral meeting between the U.S., Guatemala, and Mexico.

It truly is a pleasure to work with Carlos Ramiro and with Antony Blinken in these efforts.  Mexico shares thousands of kilometers with Guatemala and the U.S., and this is a deep-rooted history.  And the symbolism of brotherhood with no borders is what brings us together today.

Guatemala and Mexico share common cultural roots over the millennia.  Our common dream has seen a civilization rise, perhaps one of the largest in the Americas, which is from the Maya culture.  And last August we were happy to attend the democratic ceremony whereby Guatemala resolved to elect as its leader Bernardo Arévalo in January of this year.  We made a call to the Government of Guatemala so that this constitutional mandate would go into effect.  I believe that this has happened, and President Bernardo Arévalo, Karin Herrera, the vice president, have a bright path ahead of them.  The Mexican Government applauds the fact that this transfer of power did take place, and we affirm our firm support for Bernardo Arévalo and his administration.

In the framework of respect for our sovereignty, Mexico reiterates its interest in strengthening this relationship between Guatemala and the U.S. with Mexico.  The difficult paths that migrants in our continent take towards the north to seek better and more opportunities in life is transcendental.  It stops at the line that separates the U.S. and Mexico, and Chiapas, Campeche, Tabasco, with Guatemalan provinces. These geographical circumstances means that as countries, we face most of the cycles of the migration process.  Guatemala and Mexico are origin, transit, destination, and return.  And beyond that, we have the human reality.  This links us as countries that must work together to face migration and solve these challenges.

That is why I’m glad we have a shared vision and we have worked bilaterally with the U.S.  And I feel very proud of that because, as Secretary Blinken said, this is the best time of our relationship, but we also face the greatest challenges of our history, possibly.  So I think that finding solutions to these challenges with a more regional perspective will truly be transcendental, and I think it will be unheard of because we are developing a unique migration model.  And that is the truth.

I think that this can even be a model for other regions throughout the world to go beyond unilateralism and things that are simply situation-based.   I think – I would say that we are very excited about finding specific measures for cooperation, for the development of our societies, for a holistic vision, the well-being of our people, and to transform human mobility from a condition that is imposed to an option.

We look at migrants as people who are moving for work.  That is what we see.  We see people who are seeking opportunities.  And that is why we believe that this is a time where to turn migration into an option and not an obligation, we need to look at the root causes.  And that is one of the topics on our agenda that will be a very important one.  And the second one will be:  how do we strengthen regular pathways for labor mobility?  Deep down, then, how do we help people who are seeking opportunities to find them?

And that is why we need to mobilize our industrial sector.  We need to mobilize the private sector and really all stakeholders involved.  And I think that Guatemala as a country historically has been characterized by a search, a long-enduring search for peace and well-being of their people, Mexico and the United States as well.  But Guatemala is a country of illustrious people such as Juan José Arévalo, Miguel Ángel , Jacobo Árbenz, who are well-remembered; Rigoberta Menchú, whose words are still very much relevant today.  And that is why I would say, in the words of Rigoberta Menchú, peace is not only the absence of war.  As long as there is poverty, racism, and discrimination and exclusion, it will be difficult for us to achieve peace in the world.

Thank you very much.  We are ready for a very productive agenda with concrete results.

FOREIGN MINISTER MARTÍNEZ (Via interpreter) Good morning.  Thank you very much to our hosts, to the U.S. delegation led by Secretaries Blinken and Mayorkas.  Thank you to Mexico, Alicia Bárcena, foreign minister, and Mexican officials of the delegation.

I would like to start by thanking the U.S. and Mexico for the support you provided my country.  And I say my country and not an elected administration because it was truly Guatemala that received your support in our search for a space to ensure democracy, for respect for our votes, so that President Arévalo, the president-elect, could take power on a long, long day on January 14th.  There were difficult months, and you were with us throughout them.  And we received significant support from the international community as well, and I believe that if that had not been the case, I would not be sitting here today in this room speaking to you.

I think that the commitment of President Arévalo’s administration is clear and evident.  It is clear in the sense that we must keep working with the U.S. and with Mexico on these issues – in this specific case, irregular migration.  But we have a vast agenda for cooperation, investment, dialogue that bring us together that bring us closer, and this is the fundamental goal of the work of the current administration, the Arévalo administration.

With Mexico, as Secretary Bárcena said, we share a history, we share a border, and therefore we also share a series of common challenges that we are trying to manage the best way possible with the support, of course, of the United States.  The challenge of irregular migration, as Secretary Blinken said, in order to make it safe, orderly, and humane, this is fundamental.  We need to look at the causes; we need to look at the roots of this phenomenon.

Sometimes it’s called a problem, the migration – irregular migration problem.  We see it as a phenomenon, not a problem.  And we believe that behind this, of course, there is a fundamental task for the Guatemalan state.  We are the first who must manage the needs of our population.  We must create and provide opportunities so that our people do not migrate, so that these flows of Guatemalans seeking opportunities do not continue to grow.  So the first task is a task for the Guatemalan state.

And of course, we must work along with the international community and with any support that you can provide so that we can create a space for opportunities and possibilities because in the long term the issue is really development.  Root causes – these may be words that we add to a word that sums it all up, which is development.  That’s what we don’t have.  We have deficiencies in Guatemala.  We have accumulated social debt over decades.  This is an effort that, even if we work over the next four years, we will not correct this scenario, but rather we want to build a foundation upon which to build a new country.

I think, as has been mentioned, we need to broaden legal pathways, such as via temporary work.  That is a clear measure for support, for assistance.  We must explore regular pathways for labor mobility.  This is a joint task, as has been mentioned.  A single country cannot manage this issue alone.  We have seen how the phenomena has broadened and expanded to other regions, regions I won’t mention, but it used to be there was barely a trickle; now there are great migration flows, irregular migration.

So the work needs to revolve around joint work among countries.  We must have a comprehensive view of the phenomena, and we must, as states, be responsible.  But other stakeholders must be as well.  We can’t cast the private sector aside.  That is a basic instrument as well when it comes to creating jobs.  Guatemala as an origin, transit destination, and return country is committed, and we would like to express this today at this table.  We are committed to find solutions for working together and cooperating with the United States and Mexico.  Thank you very much.

  Population, Refugees, and Migration (U.S. Department of State)

 2 days 10 hours ago

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Junior Professional Officer – Associate Officer, Multiple Locations

The following UNHCR JPO vacancies are open for applications:

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To learn of other international career opportunities available to U.S. Citizens please see the Department of State, Bureau of International Organization’s career website.

  Population, Refugees, and Migration (U.S. Department of State)

 2 weeks 1 day ago

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Secretary Blinken’s Meeting with Jordanian King Abdullah II
HomeOffice of the SpokespersonPress Releases…Secretary Blinken’s Meeting with Jordanian King Abdullah II hide if(window.jQuery) { jQuery( document ).ready(function() { if (jQuery(".bc_middle").hasClass("collapse")) { jQuery(".bc_ellipse").click(function(){ jQuery(".bc_hide").toggleClass("visible"); jQuery(".bc_middle").toggle(); jQuery(".bc_ellipse").toggle(); jQuery(".bc_content").toggleClass("noflex"); jQuery(".block_breadcrumbs_content").toggleClass("noflex"); }); jQuery(".bc_hide").click(function(){ jQuery(".bc_hide").toggleClass("visible"); jQuery(".bc_middle").toggle(); jQuery(".bc_ellipse").toggle(); jQuery(".bc_content").toggleClass("noflex"); jQuery(".block_breadcrumbs_content").toggleClass("noflex"); }); } else { jQuery(".bc_ellipse").hide(); } }); } Secretary Blinken’s Meeting with Jordanian King Abdullah II

Readout

February 13, 2024

Secretary of State Antony J. Blinken met today with His Majesty King Abdullah II of Jordan in Washington.  The Secretary expressed gratitude for the longstanding partnership between the two nations, acknowledging the 75th anniversary of U.S.-Jordan diplomatic relations.  The Secretary emphasized the importance of the U.S.-Jordan partnership as a pillar of stability in the region and underlined the U.S. commitment to working with our Jordanian partners to further regional peace and security.  He thanked King Abdullah for Jordan’s continued efforts to bring critical humanitarian assistance to Palestinian civilians in Gaza and they discussed ways to expedite the flow of additional aid to Gaza from Jordan.  

Secretary Blinken and King Abdullah continued discussions about achieving an enduring end to the crisis in Gaza that provides lasting peace and security for Israelis and Palestinians alike, and Secretary Blinken underscored the U.S. commitment to the establishment of an independent Palestinian state with security guarantees for Israel.

As the holy month of Ramadan approaches, Secretary Blinken also underlined the need to preserve the historic status quo at Jerusalem’s Haram al-Sharif/Temple Mount and recognized the Hashemite Kingdom of Jordan’s special role in the Muslim holy shrines in Jerusalem.

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  Population, Refugees, and Migration (U.S. Department of State)

 2 weeks 3 days ago

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One-Year Anniversary of the Welcome Corps
HomeOffice of the SpokespersonPress Releases…One-Year Anniversary of the Welcome Corps hide if(window.jQuery) { jQuery( document ).ready(function() { if (jQuery(".bc_middle").hasClass("collapse")) { jQuery(".bc_ellipse").click(function(){ jQuery(".bc_hide").toggleClass("visible"); jQuery(".bc_middle").toggle(); jQuery(".bc_ellipse").toggle(); jQuery(".bc_content").toggleClass("noflex"); jQuery(".block_breadcrumbs_content").toggleClass("noflex"); }); jQuery(".bc_hide").click(function(){ jQuery(".bc_hide").toggleClass("visible"); jQuery(".bc_middle").toggle(); jQuery(".bc_ellipse").toggle(); jQuery(".bc_content").toggleClass("noflex"); jQuery(".block_breadcrumbs_content").toggleClass("noflex"); }); } else { jQuery(".bc_ellipse").hide(); } }); } One-Year Anniversary of the Welcome Corps

Fact Sheet

January 19, 2024

The Department of State, in collaboration with the Department of Health and Human Services, is pleased to commemorate the one-year anniversary of the Welcome Corps, our private sponsorship program that empowers everyday Americans to welcome refugees arriving through the U.S. Refugee Admissions Program (USRAP).  Welcome Corps sponsors support refugees’ resettlement and integration as they build new lives in the United States.  Through this service opportunity, more than 15,000 Americans have already applied to sponsor more than 7,000 refugees through the Welcome Corps, exceeding our mobilization goal for the program’s first year.

In the Welcome Corps’ first year:

  • More than 100 sponsor groups from 32 states have signed up to be matched with refugees in need of resettlement support. Sponsors welcomed the first refugee arrivals on World Refugee Day in June 2023 and have since welcomed nearly 100 refugees from around the world.
  • More than 68,000 individuals from across the country have signed up to learn more about refugee sponsorship through the Welcome Corps, and nearly 50,000 have attended information sessions and completed training.
  • The Department of State introduced the Welcome Corps on Campus, a higher education sponsorship initiative that enables U.S. colleges and universities to play a leading role in resettling refugee students.
  • In September, we made it possible for sponsors to indicate the characteristics of refugees they are best able to support, expressing preference for speakers of specific languages, nationalities, or family size. For example, sponsors from veterans’ organizations can indicate a specific interest in sponsoring Afghan or Iraqi refugees, or Returned Peace Corps Volunteers can sponsor refugees from their country of service.
  • The Welcome Corps recently expanded to make it possible for Americans to apply to refer specific refugees for resettlement in the United States directly to the USRAP. More information on how Americans can sponsor a refugee they know, including refugee eligibility criteria, is available on WelcomeCorps.org.

In 2024, the Department of State will launch a labor sponsorship pathway called Welcome Corps at Work, through which skilled refugees can be matched with U.S. employers in industries such as hospitality, healthcare, and technology.  With a job offer in hand, these refugees will be referred to the USRAP and receive support upon arrival from private sponsors in the community of their employer.

In its second year, the Welcome Corps is asking even more sponsors to answer the call to welcome refugees and change lives, including their own.  To learn more about the Welcome Corps, to sign up for updates, or to find information about becoming a sponsor, please visit WelcomeCorps.org.

About the Welcome Corps

The Welcome Corps is one of the many ways we are expanding our capacity to provide a new beginning to more refugees and meeting the Biden Administration’s goal of admitting 125,000 refugees in Fiscal Year 2024.  In groups of five or more, adult U.S. citizens and legal permanent residents support refugees in building new lives in the United States by securing and preparing initial housing, greeting refugees at the airport, enrolling children in school, helping adults find employment, and forging ties to their new communities. All refugees arriving in the United States through the Welcome Corps have successfully completed all steps in the U.S. government refugee resettlement process, including passing extensive security screening and other vetting.  By virtue of their refugee status, they are authorized to work and have access to key public benefits.  They can eventually apply for lawful permanent residence and U.S. citizenship.  Access to the USRAP and support from the Welcome Corps is free of charge for refugees.  Refugees should not pay anyone to refer their case to the U.S. government or to be matched with private sponsors.

The Welcome Corps was launched by the U.S. Department of State’s Bureau of Population, Refugees, and Migration (PRM) in January 2023.  The Department funds a consortium of non-profit organizations with expertise in refugee resettlement, protection, and integration to implement the Welcome Corps under a cooperative agreement.

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  Population, Refugees, and Migration (U.S. Department of State)

 1 month 1 week ago

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International Migrants Day

Antony J. Blinken, Secretary of State

On International Migrants Day, we recognize the hundreds of millions of migrants living outside of their home countries.  It is imperative that countries expand lawful pathways, protect vulnerable migrants, promote inclusion, and advance policies and processes to promote safe, orderly, and humane migration.  The United States is committed to leading these efforts globally.

The United States has led the largest expansion in decades of lawful migration pathways to help vulnerable migrants, refugees, and other displaced persons.  We commend other countries that are likewise expanding regular pathways, creating safe options for migrants while respecting national sovereignty and security.  Tens of thousands of individuals have benefited from rapid processing and support through the Safe Mobility initiative since its launch in June 2023.  We have resettled more refugees than any other country in the world, welcoming more than 3.5 million refugees into communities across the country since 1975.  Immigrants make tremendous social and economic contributions that drive our nation’s competitiveness and innovation on the global stage.

Worldwide, we are the largest single provider of humanitarian assistance reaching people in need, including refugees, conflict victims, internally displaced persons, stateless persons, and vulnerable migrants.  In FY 2023, the United States provided nearly $15 billion in life-saving humanitarian assistance.  Together with our partners we are working toward a future where migration is a safe, regular, voluntary, and informed choice.

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  Population, Refugees, and Migration (U.S. Department of State)

 2 months 2 weeks ago

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United States Announces New Pledges at 2023 Global Refugee Forum 
HomeOffice of the SpokespersonPress Releases…United States Announces New Pledges at 2023 Global Refugee Forum  hide if(window.jQuery) { jQuery( document ).ready(function() { if (jQuery(".bc_middle").hasClass("collapse")) { jQuery(".bc_ellipse").click(function(){ jQuery(".bc_hide").toggleClass("visible"); jQuery(".bc_middle").toggle(); jQuery(".bc_ellipse").toggle(); jQuery(".bc_content").toggleClass("noflex"); jQuery(".block_breadcrumbs_content").toggleClass("noflex"); }); jQuery(".bc_hide").click(function(){ jQuery(".bc_hide").toggleClass("visible"); jQuery(".bc_middle").toggle(); jQuery(".bc_ellipse").toggle(); jQuery(".bc_content").toggleClass("noflex"); jQuery(".block_breadcrumbs_content").toggleClass("noflex"); }); } else { jQuery(".bc_ellipse").hide(); } }); } United States Announces New Pledges at 2023 Global Refugee Forum 

Fact Sheet

December 15, 2023

From December 13-15 at the Global Refugee Forum (GRF), the largest international gathering on refugees, the United States announced 26 unique commitments toward eight multi-stakeholder pledges demonstrating U.S. leadership in meeting the needs of refugees and host communities in this time of historic displacement.  The United States is spearheading high-level action with diverse global partners, strengthening global refugee resettlement opportunities, and encouraging more comprehensive and innovative responses and solutions to refugee and host community needs.   

When consultations toward the Global Compact on Refugees began in 2016, forcibly displaced people around the world numbered 65.6 million.  Each year since then has set a successive record for the highest number of displaced persons ever recorded.  Global forced displacement is increasing at unprecedented rates, with the Office of the UN High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR) estimating as of December 2023 more than 130 million people are forcibly displaced or stateless worldwide.  For the international community, the need to broaden the base of support for refugees worldwide has never been more urgent.  

The United States reaffirms our commitment to the Global Compact on Refugees and underscores our dedication to championing refugee protection and solutions.  New pledges from the United States announced at the 2023 Global Refugee Forum include: 

Economic Inclusion and Social Protection 
  • Expand the refugee self-reliance initiative matching pledge: The United States pledges to join the Refugee Self-Reliance Initiative (RSI), including in Bangladesh, Colombia, and Kenya.  U.S. diplomatic and financial support will help this broad coalition of multilateral, non-governmental, private sector, development actors, government, and civil society organizations in reaching two million households by 2027. 
  • Increase private sector engagement to mobilize investment and support economic inclusion in refugee-hosting contexts: The United States pledges to support the International Finance Corporation – UNHCR Joint Initiative to promote private sector solutions in refugee areas.  The United States will promote the World Economic Forum’s (WEF) Humanitarian Resilience Investing Call to Action and the WEF’s Uplink Challenge.  The United States will continue its formal partnership with the Tent Partnership for Refugees to expand refugee employment opportunities globally.  The United States will also partner with the Refugee Investment Network (RIN) to map private sector capacity in northern Kenya.  Finally, the United States will continue to deepen its own partnerships with social impact companies and investors, international development financing corporations, and others. 
  • Support multilateral development bank (MDB) financing for refugees and host communities: The United States pledges continued support for MDB financing mechanisms for refugees, migrants, and host communities, namely the World Bank International Development Association Window for Host Communities and Refugees, the Global Concessional Financing Facility, and the Inter-American Development Bank’s Migration Initiative.  The United States will deepen its ties with the Africa Development Bank.  
  • Support the MIRPS Joint Pledge on Integration of Displaced Persons: As the 2022-2023 Chair of the MIRPS Support Platform, the United States pledges continuing support in alignment with efforts by the MIRPS States to advance the self-reliance of refugees, other forcibly displaced and stateless people, and host communities in Central America and Mexico.  In 2023, the United States led three multilateral learning events with the Governments of El Salvador, Costa Rica, and Colombia to facilitate the sharing of good practices on local integration, including on mental health and psychosocial support, financial and economic inclusion, and on IDP-specific approaches.  In 2024, the United States, through UNHCR, will support targeted projects with each MIRPS State to implement these good practices to foster local integration as a durable solution for refugees and other displaced persons in the region. 
Gender Equality and Protection from Gender-based Violence 
  • Prioritize gender-based violence prevention, mitigation, and response across humanitarian responses globally, from the outset of all types of crises: Through the Safe from the Start ReVisioned initiative, the United States will prioritize gender-based violence prevention and survivor-centered response programming and drive increased representation and leadership of women and girls in decision-making structures. 
  • Strengthen gender-based violence service delivery in food insecure environments: The United States will support the UNHCR-World Food Program Joint Programme of Excellence in Targeting Hub to collect gender-sensitive data on food insecurity and vulnerability analysis. 
  • Foster greater inclusion of refugee-hosting states within the Call to Action on Protection from Gender-based Violence in Emergencies: The United States will advocate for refugee-hosting countries to join the Call to Action. 
Resettlement 
  • Commit to increasing global resettlement opportunities: President Biden committed to admitting up to 125,000 refugees to the United States annually.  After working to rebuild the capacity of the U.S. Refugee Admissions Program (USRAP), the United States is poised to meet this ambitious goal this fiscal year. 
  • Regularly convene the Resettlement Diplomacy Network: The United States is committed to chairing and regularly convening the Resettlement Diplomacy Network (RDN), including at both the senior officials and ministerial level in 2024 and beyond.  The United States is committed to using the RDN as a high-level strategic and diplomatic engagement mechanism to strengthen and expand access to global refugee resettlement, increase complementary migration pathways for those in need of protection, and offer a forum for emergency coordination. 
  • Expand equitable access to resettlement: The United States is committed to expanding equitable access to resettlement and continuing to accept diverse profiles of refugees of many nationalities worldwide.  The United States will continue to expand upon existing pathways and open new pathways for resettlement referrals, including for populations who have historically had less access to the USRAP.  These efforts include innovations in private sponsorships through the Welcome Corps, expanded referrals through non-governmental organization networks, and establishing new referral authorities for U.S. Government officials with a focus on human rights defenders and LGBTQI+ populations. 
Community Sponsorship 
  • Commit to expanding private sponsorship: Following the 2021 U.S. pledge from the high-level officials meeting to establish a private sponsorship program, the United States launched the Welcome Corps in January 2023.  In support of the multistakeholder pledge on community sponsorship, the United States commits to continue to scale the Welcome Corps by engaging civil society organizations and local communities and strengthening partnerships to welcome 10,000 refugees in Fiscal Year 2024 through the Welcome Corps. 
  • Input to infrastructure for the Global Sponsorship Fund: The United States pledges to support the Global Refugee Sponsorship Initiative (GRSI) community of practice to finalize the governance and infrastructure of the GSRI’s Global Sponsorship Fund. 
  • Expand community sponsorship: As part of the multistakeholder pledge on community sponsorship, the United States pledges to support expansion of U.S. community engagement in resettlement, particularly through co-sponsorship.  Toward this pledge, the United States intends to continue to fund the Refugee Welcome Collective, a consortium that provides technical assistance and capacity building resources to expand the number of community members and newly arrived refugees who participate in community sponsorship programs in the United States. 
Skills-based Complementary Pathways 
  • Launch Welcome Corps at Work: To increase economic inclusion and access to livelihoods, the United States will launch a specialized labor mobility program for refugees as part of the Welcome Corps, the private sponsorship program through the USRAP, in 2024.  By 2027, the United States pledges to admit at least 300 refugees, including primary applicants and their family members, through the Welcome Corps at Work. 
  • Expand Welcome Corps on Campus:  To expand access to higher education for refugees, the United States is implementing a specialized higher education program as part of the Welcome Corps, the private sponsorship program through the USRAP.  By 2027, the United States pledges to partner with 75 higher education institutes to admit at least 275 students through the Welcome Corps on Campus. 
Rohingya 
  • Increase Rohingya resettlement to the United States: The United States recognizes the Rohingya situation as a priority and pledges to continue to expand the number of Rohingya, including from Bangladesh, resettled through the USRAP in Fiscal Year 2024. 
  • Encourage third countries to expand Rohingya resettlement: The United States pledges to continue through calendar year 2024 to use its experience with resettling Rohingya refugees and its positions as chair of the Resettlement Diplomacy Network and a co-chair of the Priority Situations Core Group (PSCG) to encourage other countries to expand or create new third-country solutions for Rohingya refugees. 
  • Encourage Rohingya access to the U.S. Welcome Corps at Work labor mobility program for refugees: The United States pledges through its Welcome Corps at Work, the new labor mobility program for refugees within Welcome Corps, to focus on Rohingya refugees gaining access to employment in the United States. 
  • Expand skills of Rohingya refugees and host communities: The United States pledges to support efforts to expand programs that offer numeracy, literacy, and vocational training as well as formal skills certification to Rohingya refugees and host communities.  This includes engaging with private sector actors who could contribute financial, in-kind, or technical support to these programs. 
  • Support international financial institutions’ engagement with Rohingya refugees and host communities: The United States will work with the donor community and host governments to support the efforts of international financial institutions to develop effective means of supporting Rohingya refugees and surrounding host communities. 
  • Strengthen humanitarian and development coherence in Rohingya refugee programs: The United States will strengthen the internal coherence of its humanitarian and development assistance for Rohingya refugees and hosting countries, including through the development of a program to build the capacity of partners to address the unique health and protection needs of Rohingya refugees. 
Ending Statelessness 
  • Join the Global Alliance to End Statelessness: The United States pledges to become a member of the Global Alliance to End Statelessness. 
  • Expand advocacy around inclusion of stateless persons in statistics: The United States pledges to expand global engagement and advocacy for the improvement of statelessness data and the inclusion of stateless persons in statistics, including by supporting the International Recommendations in Statelessness Statistics and the World Bank-UNHCR Joint Data Center on Forced Displacement. 
Refugee-Inclusive Education 
  • Advocate for inclusion of refugees in national education systems: The United States will advocate for, incentivize, and include refugees in development-funded education programs, in locations where host countries have favorable policies for inclusion of refugees in the national system. 
  • Incorporate Refugees in U.S. government education strategy: The United States will include refugees in the U.S. Government Strategy on Interagency Basic Education. 
  • Support Refugee-inclusive multilateral engagement: The United States will advocate for refugee inclusion in multilateral engagement including the Global Partnership for Education, hosted by the World Bank, and Education Cannot Wait, hosted by UNICEF. 

The political commitments by the United States toward the pledges, as well as the pledges themselves, are not legally binding under international or U.S. law. 

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Bureau of Population, Refugees, and Migration Office of the Spokesperson Refugee and Humanitarian Assistance Refugees United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees

  Population, Refugees, and Migration (U.S. Department of State)

 2 months 2 weeks ago

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U.S. Convenes Resettlement Diplomacy Network Senior Officials Meeting on Margins of Global Refugee Forum

Office of the Spokesperson

Assistant Secretary of State for the Bureau of Population, Refugees, and Migration Julieta Valls Noyes convened the second Senior Officials Meeting of the Resettlement Diplomacy Network (RDN) on the sidelines of the Global Refugee Forum in Geneva, Switzerland on Thursday, December 14, 2023.  Today’s meeting built on progress made at the RDN’s ministerial meeting, chaired by Secretary Blinken at the U.N. General Assembly in September. 

Government officials from Australia, Canada, Italy, New Zealand, Spain, and the United Kingdom, along with representatives of the European Commission, participated.  The Governments of Brazil and Germany attended as observer states. 

This meeting provided an opportunity for RDN members to reconvene at a senior level, reflect on the RDN’s work, and discuss priorities for 2024.  The discussion focused on the RDN’s Emergency Coordination Platform, global emergency transit infrastructure, and strategic collaboration on shared priorities.  The Emergency Coordination Platform has become a critical mechanism for states to coordinate and discuss emergent refugee crises, such as Afghans in need of resettlement. 

At the Global Refugee Forum, as part of the multi-stakeholder pledge on resettlement, the United States committed to chairing and regularly convening the RDN at both the Senior Officials and Ministerial level in 2024 and beyond.  The United States is committed to using the RDN for high-level strategic and diplomatic engagement to strengthen the global system, expand access to refugee resettlement and complementary pathways worldwide, and coordinate on emergency situations. 

The United States launched the RDN in September 2022.  The Refugee Hub and the Migration Policy Institute support the U.S. chairmanship of the RDN, as co-hosts of the RDN secretariat.

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Bureau of East Asian and Pacific Affairs Bureau of European and Eurasian Affairs Bureau of Population, Refugees, and Migration Office of the Spokesperson Refugees

  Population, Refugees, and Migration (U.S. Department of State)

 2 months 2 weeks ago

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Assistant Secretary Noyes Travels to Switzerland 
HomeOffice of the SpokespersonPress Releases…Assistant Secretary Noyes Travels to Switzerland  hide if(window.jQuery) { jQuery( document ).ready(function() { if (jQuery(".bc_middle").hasClass("collapse")) { jQuery(".bc_ellipse").click(function(){ jQuery(".bc_hide").toggleClass("visible"); jQuery(".bc_middle").toggle(); jQuery(".bc_ellipse").toggle(); jQuery(".bc_content").toggleClass("noflex"); jQuery(".block_breadcrumbs_content").toggleClass("noflex"); }); jQuery(".bc_hide").click(function(){ jQuery(".bc_hide").toggleClass("visible"); jQuery(".bc_middle").toggle(); jQuery(".bc_ellipse").toggle(); jQuery(".bc_content").toggleClass("noflex"); jQuery(".block_breadcrumbs_content").toggleClass("noflex"); }); } else { jQuery(".bc_ellipse").hide(); } }); } Assistant Secretary Noyes Travels to Switzerland 

Media Note

December 11, 2023

Assistant Secretary of State for the Bureau of Population, Refugees, and Migration Julieta Valls Noyes will travel to Geneva, Switzerland December 12-15, 2023.

In Geneva, Assistant Secretary Noyes will join the U.S. delegation at the Global Refugee Forum (GRF), the largest international gathering on refugees, held every four years.  The 2023 GRF is co-convened by Colombia, France, Japan, Jordan, and Uganda, and co-hosted by the Government of Switzerland and UNHCR, the UN Refugee Agency. 

At the GRF, the Assistant Secretary will participate in high-level meetings with senior government officials, as well as non-governmental and international organization partners, on topics including refugee employment and entrepreneurship, private sector engagement, and solutions for Rohingya refugees.  She will chair a high-level event on the MIRPS Support Platform, a donor coordination and awareness-raising forum to foster regional solutions to forced displacement, bolstering efforts by governments in Central America and Mexico. The Assistant Secretary will chair a Senior Officials’ meeting of the Resettlement Diplomacy Network, a multilateral initiative launched by the United States in 2022 to drive strategic diplomatic engagement on global refugee resettlement and protection.  Finally, Assistant Secretary Noyes will participate in a U.S.-hosted dinner with the World Economic Forum calling on humanitarian and development organizations, donors, development finance institutions, foundations, investors, and others to mobilize $10 billion in capital to establish or grow 1,000 businesses in fragile or frontier markets by 2030.

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Bureau of European and Eurasian Affairs Bureau of Population, Refugees, and Migration Economic Affairs Migration Office of the Spokesperson Refugee and Humanitarian Assistance Refugees Resettlement Switzerland

  Population, Refugees, and Migration (U.S. Department of State)

 2 months 3 weeks ago

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